The block on UK onshore wind farms is no more

onshore wind pinwheelOnshore wind companies can now compete for clean energy contracts. Despite onerous planning barriers, this is a big step.

In the windiest country in Europe, the UK government ended a five-year block on new onshore wind turbines. It’s a victory for campaigners, and anyone who wants action on the climate crisis and cares about lower energy bills in future.
Continue reading “The block on UK onshore wind farms is no more”

Wind Generation Exceeds Hydroelectric in 2019: Stocks in Focus

wind generation from wind turbinePer a latest report by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), annual electricity generation from wind energy in the nation exceeded hydroelectric generation for the first time in 2019. Impressively, this announcement was in line with EIA’s prediction around middle of last year.

Notably, the ISE Global Wind Energy Index has returned a solid 31.9% in 2019 compared with S&P 500 Index’s 30.3% return. This should encourage investors interested in renewable energy to turn their focus toward wind stocks, in particular. Continue reading “Wind Generation Exceeds Hydroelectric in 2019: Stocks in Focus”

Costa Rica Is At Nearly 100% Renewable Energy For Electricity

renewable energyCosta Rica is blessed with an abundance of free-flowing water which it uses to generate more than 78% of the electricity it needs. But it is committed to getting to 100% renewables as soon as the end of this year. Is that possible? Look at it this way. In 2019, 99.62% of the country’s electricity came from renewables, according to REVE. In addition to hydro, 10.29% was derived from wind turbines, 10.23% from geothermal energy, and 0.84% from solar. Continue reading “Costa Rica Is At Nearly 100% Renewable Energy For Electricity”

Nuclear Power ‘Cannot Rival Renewable Energy’

nuclear power plantNuclear power is in terminal decline worldwide and will never make a serious contribution to tackling climate change, a group of energy experts argues.

Meeting recently in London at Chatham House, the UK’s Royal Institution of International Affairs, they agreed that despite continued enthusiasm from the industry, and from some politicians, the number of nuclear power stations under construction worldwide would not be enough to replace those closing down.

The industry was disappearing, they concluded, while the wind and solar sectors were powering ahead. Continue reading “Nuclear Power ‘Cannot Rival Renewable Energy’”

Breakthrough innovation enables cheaper solar energy production

solar energy breakthroughWhile the need for renewable energy around the world is growing exponentially, Lithuanian and German researchers have come up with a novel solution for developing low-cost solar technology. Material, synthesised by Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) Lithuania scientists, which self-assemble to form a molecular-thick electrode layer, presents a facile way of realising highly efficient perovskite single-junction and tandem solar cells. The licence to produce the material has been purchased by a Japanese company.

According to scientists, achieving perovskite-based solar cells, combining low price and high efficiency, has proven to be a difficult endeavour in the past. The particular challenge in large-scale production is the high price and limited versatility of the available hole-selective contacts. KTU chemists have addressed this challenge. Continue reading “Breakthrough innovation enables cheaper solar energy production”

German renewable energy output surges on offshore wind updraft

offshore windGermany’s offshore wind power production has surged by almost 25% this year, or 24TWh, up from 19.5TWh in 2018, helping to carry the share of renewables in Europe’s largest economy to 43% of its gross power consumption.

That was up from 38.2% in 2018, preliminary figures from solar and hydrogen research centre Baden-Württemberg (ZSW) and the German federation of energy and water industries (BDEW) show. Continue reading “German renewable energy output surges on offshore wind updraft”

Report: Renewable Energy to Expand by 50% in Next Five Years

Global supplies of renewable electricity are growing faster than expected and could expand by 50% in the next five years, powered by a resurgence in solar energy.

The International Energy Agency (IEA) found that solar, wind and hydropower projects are rolling out at their fastest rate in four years.

Its latest report predicts that by 2024 a new dawn for cheap solar power could see the world’s solar capacity grow by 600GW, almost double the installed total electricity capacity of Japan. Overall, renewable electricity is expected to grow by 1,200GW in the next five years, the equivalent of the total electricity capacity of the US. Continue reading “Report: Renewable Energy to Expand by 50% in Next Five Years”

More Renewables Than Fossil Fuels: The U.K. Reaches an Energy Milestone

Renewable energy has made a breakthrough in the U.K. The third quarter of this year was the first where more electricity was generated from renewable sources than from fossil fuels.

According to new analysis by the climate change analysis site Carbon Brief, Q3 saw 40% of power come from renewables such as wind, biomass and solar, while fossil fuels—almost all gas, as coal and oil now have a negligible share of the U.K. energy scene—accounted for 39% of generation. (The remaining 21% largely came from nuclear.) Continue reading “More Renewables Than Fossil Fuels: The U.K. Reaches an Energy Milestone”

Breathing new life into renewable energy

Green technology has come a long way. The next challenge for the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory is to develop ways to recycle the recycling infrastructure.

The clean energy sector faces a major stumbling block. The power it produces may be renewable, but the infrastructure it uses is far from it.

Over the past decade, advances in composite materials have allowed the construction of enormous turbine blades. Some are now longer than the wingspan of a Boeing 747. As blades have increased, so have the costs to transport them. When wind farms need to replace aging blades, it is now often cheaper to leave them lying on the ground. Continue reading “Breathing new life into renewable energy”

Twenty UK universities have agreed £50m deal to buy renewable energy from British windfarms

Twenty of the UK’s leading universities have struck a £50m deal to buy renewable energy directly from British windfarms for the first time.

The collaborative clean energy deal will supply electricity from wind farms across Scotland and Wales to universities including Newcastle University, University of Exeter and Aberystwyth University.

The landmark deal, known as a “power purchase agreement” or PPA, is the first time that public sector energy users have clubbed together to buy clean electricity.

The PPA was arranged by deal brokers at The Energy Consortium and Squeaky Clean Energy to fix the price of renewable electricity from a portfolio British windfarms for the next 10 years. Continue reading “Twenty UK universities have agreed £50m deal to buy renewable energy from British windfarms”