Apple partnering with tech giants for big clean energy buy

The wind farm, named the White Mesa Wind project, will be located in Crocket County, Texas. When completed in 2021, it will be capable of supplying 500 megawatts of power to the surrounding area.

Founded in 2009, Apex Clean Energy is a wind-energy company based in Virginia with 13 wind energy projects in Oklahoma, Texas, and Illinois.

Apple will be the largest purchaser in the agreement. Between the four companies, the purchase totals 75 megawatts of clean energy—or enough to power roughly 20,000 homes. The agreement will enable those involved to access cost-effective renewable energy from Apex. Continue reading “Apple partnering with tech giants for big clean energy buy”

More Renewables Than Fossil Fuels: The U.K. Reaches an Energy Milestone

Renewable energy has made a breakthrough in the U.K. The third quarter of this year was the first where more electricity was generated from renewable sources than from fossil fuels.

According to new analysis by the climate change analysis site Carbon Brief, Q3 saw 40% of power come from renewables such as wind, biomass and solar, while fossil fuels—almost all gas, as coal and oil now have a negligible share of the U.K. energy scene—accounted for 39% of generation. (The remaining 21% largely came from nuclear.) Continue reading “More Renewables Than Fossil Fuels: The U.K. Reaches an Energy Milestone”

Breathing new life into renewable energy

Green technology has come a long way. The next challenge for the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory is to develop ways to recycle the recycling infrastructure.

The clean energy sector faces a major stumbling block. The power it produces may be renewable, but the infrastructure it uses is far from it.

Over the past decade, advances in composite materials have allowed the construction of enormous turbine blades. Some are now longer than the wingspan of a Boeing 747. As blades have increased, so have the costs to transport them. When wind farms need to replace aging blades, it is now often cheaper to leave them lying on the ground. Continue reading “Breathing new life into renewable energy”

Twenty UK universities have agreed £50m deal to buy renewable energy from British windfarms

Twenty of the UK’s leading universities have struck a £50m deal to buy renewable energy directly from British windfarms for the first time.

The collaborative clean energy deal will supply electricity from wind farms across Scotland and Wales to universities including Newcastle University, University of Exeter and Aberystwyth University.

The landmark deal, known as a “power purchase agreement” or PPA, is the first time that public sector energy users have clubbed together to buy clean electricity.

The PPA was arranged by deal brokers at The Energy Consortium and Squeaky Clean Energy to fix the price of renewable electricity from a portfolio British windfarms for the next 10 years. Continue reading “Twenty UK universities have agreed £50m deal to buy renewable energy from British windfarms”

Renewable Energy Will Provide Discount to Thousands

“Poor families are going to receive hundreds and hundreds of dollars every year because of this. If we as human beings don’t think mother nature isn’t going to bite back because what we have done, then we are living in a false reality and we need to wake up. and this project is one way to wake us up and says there is a bright beautiful future that we can have,” said former congressman Joseph Kennedy II. Continue reading “Renewable Energy Will Provide Discount to Thousands”

Orsted set to use a massive turbine to power two of its offshore wind farms in the US

Danish firm Orsted has chosen GE Renewable Energy as its preferred turbine supplier for two offshore wind farms in the U.S. The agreement means that Orsted is set to use GE Renewable Energy’s huge Haliade-X 12 MW wind turbines at the projects.

Orsted’s use of the turbines will represent the first commercial deployment of the Haliade-X 12 MW. The deployment is subject a final agreed and signed contract and project approvals.

The two wind farms the turbines will be used at are the 120 MW Skipjack facility off the Maryland coast and the 1,100 MW Ocean Wind project off the coast of New Jersey. It’s expected that the facilities will be commissioned in 2022 and 2024 respectively.

The U.S. offshore wind industry is relatively young. Its first offshore facility, the 30 MW Block Island Wind Farm, only commenced commercial operations in 2016. The Block Island Wind Farm is located off the coast of Rhode Island and operated by Orsted. Continue reading “Orsted set to use a massive turbine to power two of its offshore wind farms in the US”

Bloomberg: What’s Behind the World’s Biggest Climate Victory?

wind energyThe chief executive of the world’s largest private coal company sat before a group of U.S. lawmakers who wanted to know whether the fuel had a future. He didn’t hesitate. “Coal,” he said, “is the future.”

It was 2010. Coal supplied nearly half of America’s power, the executive testified, and was growing more than 1.5 times faster than oil, natural gas, nuclear and renewables combined. Global demand was on pace to rise 53% within two decades. And renewable energy? Not an option. “Wind and solar comprise just 1% of today’s U.S. energy mix,” Gregory Boyce, then the chief executive of Peabody Energy Corp., told the members of Congress. “It is unrealistic to suggest that renewables could replace conventional baseload fuels.” Continue reading “Bloomberg: What’s Behind the World’s Biggest Climate Victory?”

Why Solar Execs Say the Game Is Already Over for Non-Renewable Energy

Renewable Energy SourcesSolar power may currently make up less than 2% of the world’s energy mix, but the outlook of solar company executives is, uh, sunny.

“What’s important is new [energy] generation, and in the US, renewables are 70% of new generation. It’s game over,” said Tom Werner, CEO of SunPower, the California-based solar company, speaking at the Fortune Global Sustainability Forum on Thursday in Yunnan, China. “That’s why big companies in electric distribution, oil and gas are flooding into renewables.”

Christian Rynning-Tønnesen, CEO of Statkraft, the Norwegian renewable producer, was similarly bullish. “Solar will be the biggest source for electricity on the planet from 2035,” he said, adding that his calculations show renewables accounting for 80% of electricity production by 2050.

“The conversion to renewables is inevitable and it’s happening—it’s climate change and it’s costs…capitalism works,” said Werner, who claims solar will continue to benefit from the equivalent of technology’s Moore’s Law (the price of the technology has been plummeting). Continue reading “Why Solar Execs Say the Game Is Already Over for Non-Renewable Energy”

A decade of renewable energy investment, led by solar, tops USD 2.5 trillion

According to the Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2019 report, released ahead of the UN Global Climate Action Summit, this investment is set to have roughly quadrupled renewable energy capacity (excluding large hydro) from 414 GW at the end of 2009 to just over 1,650 GW when the decade closes at the end of this year.

  • The decade of investment (2010-2019) quadruples renewables capacity from 414 GW to about 1,650 GW
  • Solar capacity alone will have risen to more than 26 times the 2009 level — from 25 GW to an estimated 663 GW
  • 2018 capacity investment reached USD 272.9 billion, triple the investment in fossil fuel generation
  • Renewables generated 12.9 per cent of global electricity in 2018, avoiding 2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions

Solar power will have drawn half — USD 1.3 trillion — of the USD 2.6 trillion in renewable energy capacity investments made over the decade. Solar alone will have grown from 25 GW at the beginning of 2010 to an expected 663 GW by the close of 2019 — enough to produce all the electricity needed each year by about 100 million average homes in the USA.

Continue reading “A decade of renewable energy investment, led by solar, tops USD 2.5 trillion”

Renewable Energy has Space to Grow

By replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy, nations could achieve their emissions commitments without encroaching on vital natural land, according to researchers in the US.

Low-emission energy sources like wind and solar can have a larger geographical footprint than fossil-fuel plants of equivalent capacity. Even so, the renewable-energy potential of already developed land is more than enough to fulfill pledges made as part of the Paris Agreement and could satisfy the total energy demand projected for 2050, the analysis shows.

At the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris in 2015, 196 countries agreed to aim to limit warming to less than 2 °C above pre-industrial levels. The rapid cuts in greenhouse-gas emissions needed imply a large-scale shift away from fossil fuels. Renewable-energy schemes are not without environmental impact themselves, however, so it’s important to choose locations and generation techniques that cause the least possible harm. Continue reading “Renewable Energy has Space to Grow”