Apple partnering with tech giants for big clean energy buy

The wind farm, named the White Mesa Wind project, will be located in Crocket County, Texas. When completed in 2021, it will be capable of supplying 500 megawatts of power to the surrounding area.

Founded in 2009, Apex Clean Energy is a wind-energy company based in Virginia with 13 wind energy projects in Oklahoma, Texas, and Illinois.

Apple will be the largest purchaser in the agreement. Between the four companies, the purchase totals 75 megawatts of clean energy—or enough to power roughly 20,000 homes. The agreement will enable those involved to access cost-effective renewable energy from Apex. Continue reading “Apple partnering with tech giants for big clean energy buy”

More Renewables Than Fossil Fuels: The U.K. Reaches an Energy Milestone

Renewable energy has made a breakthrough in the U.K. The third quarter of this year was the first where more electricity was generated from renewable sources than from fossil fuels.

According to new analysis by the climate change analysis site Carbon Brief, Q3 saw 40% of power come from renewables such as wind, biomass and solar, while fossil fuels—almost all gas, as coal and oil now have a negligible share of the U.K. energy scene—accounted for 39% of generation. (The remaining 21% largely came from nuclear.) Continue reading “More Renewables Than Fossil Fuels: The U.K. Reaches an Energy Milestone”

Renewable Energy Will Provide Discount to Thousands

“Poor families are going to receive hundreds and hundreds of dollars every year because of this. If we as human beings don’t think mother nature isn’t going to bite back because what we have done, then we are living in a false reality and we need to wake up. and this project is one way to wake us up and says there is a bright beautiful future that we can have,” said former congressman Joseph Kennedy II. Continue reading “Renewable Energy Will Provide Discount to Thousands”

Bloomberg: What’s Behind the World’s Biggest Climate Victory?

wind energyThe chief executive of the world’s largest private coal company sat before a group of U.S. lawmakers who wanted to know whether the fuel had a future. He didn’t hesitate. “Coal,” he said, “is the future.”

It was 2010. Coal supplied nearly half of America’s power, the executive testified, and was growing more than 1.5 times faster than oil, natural gas, nuclear and renewables combined. Global demand was on pace to rise 53% within two decades. And renewable energy? Not an option. “Wind and solar comprise just 1% of today’s U.S. energy mix,” Gregory Boyce, then the chief executive of Peabody Energy Corp., told the members of Congress. “It is unrealistic to suggest that renewables could replace conventional baseload fuels.” Continue reading “Bloomberg: What’s Behind the World’s Biggest Climate Victory?”

Why Solar Execs Say the Game Is Already Over for Non-Renewable Energy

Renewable Energy SourcesSolar power may currently make up less than 2% of the world’s energy mix, but the outlook of solar company executives is, uh, sunny.

“What’s important is new [energy] generation, and in the US, renewables are 70% of new generation. It’s game over,” said Tom Werner, CEO of SunPower, the California-based solar company, speaking at the Fortune Global Sustainability Forum on Thursday in Yunnan, China. “That’s why big companies in electric distribution, oil and gas are flooding into renewables.”

Christian Rynning-Tønnesen, CEO of Statkraft, the Norwegian renewable producer, was similarly bullish. “Solar will be the biggest source for electricity on the planet from 2035,” he said, adding that his calculations show renewables accounting for 80% of electricity production by 2050.

“The conversion to renewables is inevitable and it’s happening—it’s climate change and it’s costs…capitalism works,” said Werner, who claims solar will continue to benefit from the equivalent of technology’s Moore’s Law (the price of the technology has been plummeting). Continue reading “Why Solar Execs Say the Game Is Already Over for Non-Renewable Energy”

Renewable Energy has Space to Grow

By replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy, nations could achieve their emissions commitments without encroaching on vital natural land, according to researchers in the US.

Low-emission energy sources like wind and solar can have a larger geographical footprint than fossil-fuel plants of equivalent capacity. Even so, the renewable-energy potential of already developed land is more than enough to fulfill pledges made as part of the Paris Agreement and could satisfy the total energy demand projected for 2050, the analysis shows.

At the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris in 2015, 196 countries agreed to aim to limit warming to less than 2 °C above pre-industrial levels. The rapid cuts in greenhouse-gas emissions needed imply a large-scale shift away from fossil fuels. Renewable-energy schemes are not without environmental impact themselves, however, so it’s important to choose locations and generation techniques that cause the least possible harm. Continue reading “Renewable Energy has Space to Grow”

Why Is U.S. Demand For Solar Panels Booming?

Solar modules prices in the United States have reversed in recent months the trend of steady declines of the past few years, as many U.S. solar companies are hoarding panels to take advantage of the full solar subsidy that is set to step down beginning next year.

Due to high demand, the price of solar modules has recently increased by 10 percent from earlier this year, Reuters’ Nichola Groom writes, citing data from energy consultancy Wood Mackenzie.

Although actual installations and in-service dates could be years away, solar power developers have been stockpiling panels in order to take advantage of the 30-percent solar Investment Tax Credit (ITC) in the United States, which, under current legislation, is set to step down to 26 percent in 2020, to 22 percent in 2021, and to drop to a permanent 10-percent beginning in January 2022.

Developers who begin construction or spend at least 5 percent of a project’s capital expenditure this year are eligible to get the 30-percent tax credit regardless of when their solar power plants actually start producing electricity. Continue reading “Why Is U.S. Demand For Solar Panels Booming?”

How Businesses Can Further the Development of Renewable Energy

The corporate world has multiple incentives for switching to more sustainable practices. Direct savings realized by business leaders include taking advantage of tax credits and deductions and lowered utility bills. Indirect savings often take the form of increased profits as public relations improve and the company customer base grows.

How Businesses Can Further the Development of Renewable Energy

In the past, certain technologies like wind and solar posed problems for industry leaders due to intermittent outages. However improvements in equipment and storage have made wind and solar power equivalent to the traditional grid in terms of performance and reliability. Here are the reasons to convert your organization to renewable energy and reap the financial rewards. Continue reading “How Businesses Can Further the Development of Renewable Energy”

Power Plants Create Giant Water Battery

Photograph: Darren Cool/E.On/PA

LOS ANGELES – California is a leader in renewable energy, and the state has pledged to use only clean sources for electricity, including wind and solar power, by 2045. One hurdle is energy storage, but an old solution involving water may help the state reach its goal of zero emissions.

The solution is “pumped storage,” which uses water in reservoirs at different elevations to smooth the fluctuations of intermittent power from the wind and sun, and makes electricity available when it is needed.

California has mandated 60% renewable energy sources for its power generation by 2030, and all zero-emission sources by 2045, which could include nuclear generation along with renewables.

Continue reading “Power Plants Create Giant Water Battery”

Finland to be carbon neutral by 2035. One of the fastest targets ever set

(Photo: Flickr/Mikko Muinonen)

Finland will go carbon neutral by 2035, under a coalition deal published on Monday, setting one of the world’s earliest timelines for reaching that mark.

After more than a month of negotiations, five parties agreed on the goal championed by incoming Social Democrat prime minister Antti Rinne.

Rinne told reporters it was time to “invest in the future”, presenting the climate strategy as part of a package with increased welfare spending.

The new government said it would legislate the target and then review it in 2025.

Unlike neighbouring Norway, which has an even earlier 2030 carbon neutral target, Finland does not intend to rely on buying credits for carbon cutting projects in other countries – although that is subject to review in 2025. Continue reading “Finland to be carbon neutral by 2035. One of the fastest targets ever set”